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Thread: Competitive Gaming Guide

  1. #1
    Shamrock's Avatar
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    Default Competitive Gaming Guide

    Sup Gentlemen,
    I've been a forum member since before it was cool. I just mainly lurk like the creepy dude at a club with his hands in his pocket.

    HOWEVER, I figured I'd contribute to this forum by giving my experience in competitive gaming. Love it or hate it, I've got some interesting history on the topic.

    CREDENTIALS
    First thing to know is, being a good gamer doesn't actually mean that you've just played a game enough to rock at it. Competitive gamers don't understand ONE game. Rather, they understand competitive play. My area of expertise is World of Warcraft; I held an arena rating of 2200 in the days of Burning Crusade. In WotLK I held 1800. In League of Legends I've hit elo of up to 1600 (though right now it sucks). In Starcraft II I had a brief stint in Diamond before quitting.

    My credentials aren't too impressive. However, I learned some awesome lessons in World of Warcraft. I met up with a player named Noone. Anyone around in the days of TBC will know him as hands down the BEST Frost Mage in the game. You can still check out his video here:

    http://www.warcraftmovies.com/movieview.php?id=70655

    He was a part of DoomSquad which was a huge PvP clan for WoW which had the best players, including people who rose to huge e-fame in WotLK and whatever they're on now. Cataclysm. That one.

    THE TIPS
    Skill in a game is constructed of three basic parts:
    1. Losing
    2. Learning from LOSSES, not wins
    3. Time.

    I never had ambition to be a pro gamer, but I played with some of the top of the World of Warcraft chain. I realize these boasting rights mean nothing in life. But screw you, I can beat you in an MMORPG I quit playing, so who wins that battle?

    Okay, advice from Noone:
    SPOTTING WHAT YOU DID WRONG:
    When you're playing games to win, leave your ego at the door. Your losses teach you more than your wins. When you win, you did something right. When you lost, you did something wrong. This applies to team games as well. You'll never get good at League of Legends by blaming your team, in the same way that you'll never get good at World of Warcraft by blaming the person you're in arena with. I learned this when I started playing Noone in Starcraft II. I was gold league with 100 wins or so. It was his first game. I won, of course. It was a cakewalk. But in four games, Noone had watched every replay and beat me hands down, to the point where I couldn't touch him anymore.

    SOME ASPECTS OF A GAME MIGHT BE FUN, BUT THEY DON'T MAKE YOU GOOD:
    World of Warcraft has raids; League of Legends has attack damage characters (and people want to play this all the damn time); Call of Duty has a campaign and side-games. These things are fun. But they don't make you a better player. Auto-locking your character in in League of Legends is retarded. You won't learn how to play the game well if you're hell bent on going solo and ignoring your team. Playing AD Carry every game isn't helpful, it's annoying.

    KEEP LEARNING:
    There is always more to learn. The better you can play every character in a game, the better you are at beating them when you're playing someone else.

    NOTHING IS OVERPOWERED:
    Okay, sometimes things are overpowered. But bitching about them doesn't help. If you fulfill your role correctly, you'll win. I know this feeling so well. Video games have a "noob" race. In Starcraft I thought it was Protoss, in World of Warcraft it was Death Knights and Paladins, in League of Legends it's someone who I fed.

    The hard thing to realize is that when you're losing, YOU'RE losing. It's not their character. It's you, and your team, and blaming your team doesn't teach you anything.

    TEAM PLAY:
    Most games, you're playing as a team. LoL, WoW, CoD. You need to learn how to compliment your team mate's abilities. This is a huge mistake people make: getting greedy and stealing kills. This especially applies to League of Legends. Yes, you may have earned the kill, but a 27/2/0 Katarina (for the clueless, 27 kills, 2 deaths, 0 assists) might be very strong, but nowhere near as strong as a team where everyone has 6 kills.

    TIME:
    The fact of the matter is, the more you play, the better you will be. Grand Master's League for SC2 is dominated by people who play all day, every day, and the only reason I got my WoW rating to 2200 in TBC is because I did NOTHING else. This is a true factor, but that's not to say that you shouldn't be winning 60-70% of your games. The difference is, you move up ladders faster and learn more if you're playing more.

    MECHANICS:
    Games have mechanics that are important to learn. A basic understanding of these will greatly improve your skill. In Starcraft II your mechanics are economy and advantages; push on economy, push on advantages.

    In League of Legends you have team composition and decision making; compile your team correctly, and don't get greedy with your decisions. When you have an advantage (i.e. one person has been picked off, making it a 4v5) use the opportunity to PUSH for a win.

    In World of Warcraft, you have individual character mechanics; don't sit in melee range of a warrior, don't let the enemy team use crowd control (cc) on you until your DPS dies.

    In Call of Duty you have advantages and positioning; Get the right position, take out an enemy and push your advantage a man stronger. Same thing with Quake. Dominate the position the enemy has to take to get weapons and upgrades, win the game.

    I hope this helps. A basic understanding of competitive play will work for every game. If you understand these rules and start WATCHING your losses, you'll be destroying me on gaming ladders soon.
    Last edited by Shamrock; 17-04-2012 at 05:50 PM.
    Couscous; the food so nice they named it twice

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamrock View Post
    Sup Gentlemen,
    I've been a forum member since before it was cool. I just mainly lurk like the creepy dude at a club with his hands in his pocket.

    HOWEVER, I figured I'd contribute to this forum by giving my experience in competitive gaming. Love it or hate it, I've got some interesting history on the topic.

    CREDENTIALS
    First thing to know is, being a good gamer doesn't actually mean that you've just played a game enough to rock at it. Competitive gamers don't understand ONE game. Rather, they understand competitive play. My area of expertise is World of Warcraft; I held an arena rating of 2200 in the days of Burning Crusade. In WotLK I held 1800. In League of Legends I've hit elo of up to 1600 (though right now it sucks). In Starcraft II I had a brief stint in Diamond before quitting.

    My credentials aren't too impressive. However, I learned some awesome lessons in World of Warcraft. I met up with a player named Noone. Anyone around in the days of TBC will know him as hands down the BEST Frost Mage in the game. You can still check out his video here:

    http://www.warcraftmovies.com/movieview.php?id=70655

    He was a part of DoomSquad which was a huge PvP clan for WoW which had the best players, including people who rose to huge e-fame in WotLK and whatever they're on now. Cataclysm. That one.

    THE TIPS
    Skill in a game is constructed of three basic parts:
    1. Losing
    2. Learning from LOSSES, not wins
    3. Time.

    I never had ambition to be a pro gamer, but I played with some of the top of the World of Warcraft chain. I realize these boasting rights mean nothing in life. But screw you, I can beat you in an MMORPG I quit playing, so who wins that battle?

    Okay, advice from Noone:
    SPOTTING WHAT YOU DID WRONG:
    When you're playing games to win, leave your ego at the door. Your losses teach you more than your wins. When you win, you did something right. When you lost, you did something wrong. This applies to team games as well. You'll never get good at League of Legends by blaming your team, in the same way that you'll never get good at World of Warcraft by blaming the person you're in arena with. I learned this when I started playing Noone in Starcraft II. I was gold league with 100 wins or so. It was his first game. I won, of course. It was a cakewalk. But in four games, Noone had watched every replay and beat me hands down, to the point where I couldn't touch him anymore.

    SOME ASPECTS OF A GAME MIGHT BE FUN, BUT THEY DON'T MAKE YOU GOOD:
    World of Warcraft has raids; League of Legends has attack damage characters (and people want to play this all the damn time); Call of Duty has a campaign and side-games. These things are fun. But they don't make you a better player. Auto-locking your character in in League of Legends is retarded. You won't learn how to play the game well if you're hell bent on going solo and ignoring your team. Playing AD Carry every game isn't helpful, it's annoying.

    KEEP LEARNING:
    There is always more to learn. The better you can play every character in a game, the better you are at beating them when you're playing someone else.

    NOTHING IS OVERPOWERED:
    Okay, sometimes things are overpowered. But bitching about them doesn't help. If you fulfill your role correctly, you'll win. I know this feeling so well. Video games have a "noob" race. In Starcraft I thought it was Protoss, in World of Warcraft it was Death Knights and Paladins, in League of Legends it's someone who I fed.

    The hard thing to realize is that when you're losing, YOU'RE losing. It's not their character. It's you, and your team, and blaming your team doesn't teach you anything.

    TEAM PLAY:
    Most games, you're playing as a team. LoL, WoW, CoD. You need to learn how to compliment your team mate's abilities. This is a huge mistake people make: getting greedy and stealing kills. This especially applies to League of Legends. Yes, you may have earned the kill, but a 27/2/0 Katarina (for the clueless, 27 kills, 2 deaths, 0 assists) might be very strong, but nowhere near as strong as a team where everyone has 6 kills.

    TIME:
    The fact of the matter is, the more you play, the better you will be. Grand Master's League for SC2 is dominated by people who play all day, every day, and the only reason I got my WoW rating to 2200 in TBC is because I did NOTHING else. This is a true factor, but that's not to say that you shouldn't be winning 60-70% of your games. The difference is, you move up ladders faster and learn more if you're playing more.

    MECHANICS:
    Games have mechanics that are important to learn. A basic understanding of these will greatly improve your skill. In Starcraft II your mechanics are economy and advantages; push on economy, push on advantages.

    In League of Legends you have team composition and decision making; compile your team correctly, and don't get greedy with your decisions. When you have an advantage (i.e. one person has been picked off, making it a 4v5) use the opportunity to PUSH for a win.

    In World of Warcraft, you have individual character mechanics; don't sit in melee range of a warrior, don't let the enemy team use crowd control (cc) on you until your DPS dies.

    In Call of Duty you have advantages and positioning; Get the right position, take out an enemy and push your advantage a man stronger. Same thing with Quake. Dominate the position the enemy has to take to get weapons and upgrades, win the game.

    I hope this helps. A basic understanding of competitive play will work for every game. If you understand these rules and start WATCHING your losses, you'll be destroying me on gaming ladders soon.
    Liked your article, think you should also touch on the aspect of people you play with competively and how to deal with comflict, being an Ex lol player, having a team with 5 guys and 2 of the guys arent getting along affects the whole team.Sure learning from your mistakes is one thing but giving your team mates a royal troll beat down wont improve your gaming nor your teams ability to be better.

    There is also the aspect that if your into your FPS games you should be doing your best to get into Alpha testing and Beta testing as ult on release you wont be spending a month or so trying to figure out everything.

    I however disagree with not blaming teammates in Dota style games, since those games are heavily dependant on what the team does as a whole, from carry to support role, if a role fails during a fight, it will be all over for everyone involved.

    Here's an eg.Lets say your playing Karthus lvl 6.
    Your team mate at the bottom manages to take one guy out but also looses one of theirs.But the enemy has 100 hp and him aswell but the creep are pushing.Do you think its right that he doesnt call for you to use your ult to save him?
    Last edited by ArchieChoke; 18-04-2012 at 10:57 AM.

  3. #3
    Shamrock's Avatar
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    ^Very valid point. Your team mates will often be retarded. There's no way around that. Even if you KNOW the people, odds are one person will play like an absolute toss. Sometimes you can handle this. A few roles in League of Legends allow you to carry a team, and contrary to what people think, I've had a lot LESS success doing so as an AD/AP carry as I have being a Jungler or Support.

    My reasoning behind saying that you shouldn't blame team mates, is you'll always have room to improve. Even if your team mates suck, there are still things you could be doing better. I actually still get really pissed off with teams in League of Legends. In non-ranked games it's fine because I know I can carry and I very rarely lose. In ranked games I get so annoyed with an auto-lock, or someone with first pick bans Morgana, or someone continuously engages despite losing every time.

    I'm currently at a really bad elo on my smurf. Started off at 900 when I took over from someone else and I've WORKED my way up to 1250, then had it drop again to 1100. I wasn't playing the games as well as I should have, but still, 75% of those games were the result of absolutely retarded team mates or just AFKers. Still, when I started improving the way I played I started winning again.
    Couscous; the food so nice they named it twice

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamrock View Post
    ^Very valid point. Your team mates will often be retarded. There's no way around that. Even if you KNOW the people, odds are one person will play like an absolute toss. Sometimes you can handle this. A few roles in League of Legends allow you to carry a team, and contrary to what people think, I've had a lot LESS success doing so as an AD/AP carry as I have being a Jungler or Support.

    My reasoning behind saying that you shouldn't blame team mates, is you'll always have room to improve. Even if your team mates suck, there are still things you could be doing better. I actually still get really pissed off with teams in League of Legends. In non-ranked games it's fine because I know I can carry and I very rarely lose. In ranked games I get so annoyed with an auto-lock, or someone with first pick bans Morgana, or someone continuously engages despite losing every time.

    I'm currently at a really bad elo on my smurf. Started off at 900 when I took over from someone else and I've WORKED my way up to 1250, then had it drop again to 1100. I wasn't playing the games as well as I should have, but still, 75% of those games were the result of absolutely retarded team mates or just AFKers. Still, when I started improving the way I played I started winning again.
    Good one dude.Still very good read up.

  5. #5
    Dakka Dakka DCWarhound's Avatar
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    StarCraft2 is a perfect example of learning from your mistakes.making that perfect rush and ironing out most of the flaws that you had in previous games.
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  6. #6

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    Good read .

    its a side of competitive play i dont normally hear about seeing as im all fps.

  7. #7
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    Glad you guys liked it. Quick update:

    I'm all about LoL right now and I recently started getting put up against super high elo players (1800+). When you see someone like that, ask them for advice. I do this every time and always get some good info out of it. Now this dude took over a friend's account to take it from 1000 elo out of elo hell -- for those that don't know, elo is the ranking system used for chess and LoL copied a version of it. Wins = points, losses = subtract points, wins vs. good players = more points, wins vs bad players = less points. Elo hell is when your ranking is so low that it doesn't really matter how well you play, your team mates are too busy reading 9gag to contribute to team fights and you lose even if you're epic.

    He can only win ~60% at 1000 elo, and he's an amazing player, with a positive score and first tower every game. So the lesson is, yes, you should still strive to improve, but if you get low down, it's a tough road out. You'll slowly raise your elo to a decent level with 60% wins, it's just really damn hard.

    There are, however, certain plays you can do which don't depend on team mates and you can carry the game basically on your own. If you're interested, here's the guide:

    A standard team setup for ranked games is:
    Bot lane: Ranged AD, Support
    Mid: AP Carry
    Top: Solo Bruiser (a Bruiser is a sort of tanky fighter. Able to sustain damage and deal damage.)
    Jungler

    Your two options for destroying the enemy team on your own are going top or jungle. Right now I'll address methods for toplane and what I've found.

    Three heroes: Malphite, Teemo, Nidalee.

    These heroes can push top all day and not give any fucks. The mechanics for Teemo and Nidalee are similar in this instance; they can litter top lane and all their possible escape routes with traps. That means, any area that the enemy team might approach from in the jungle, and if they do, which route you'll lead them through to escape. Teemo and Nidalee are awesome for this, because in addition to the insane snare/slow from their traps, they move much faster than other champions.

    If you try this build, you'll love it. Seriously, it's so much fun. However, the way you roll the champions is a bit different. Teemo, I go for: Wriggle's Lantern (sustain, wards), boots, Malady, Frozen Mallet (kite till the end of time), Wits End, then whatever suits your play style. Nidalee you just wanna roll standard AD build.

    Now, Malphite. Malphite is ridiculously good. Even heroes that should counter him (AP) can get creamed. Remember that in ranked you get the chance to counter pick, so if you're up against a Rumble top you might not want to pick Malphite. However, there's not much danger in it either. You could still pull it off. People started getting really excited at the idea of putting Vlad top and I could still win the lane. Beat them down, buy MR, your shield will handle most harass, one jungle gank at level 6 and it's over for him.

    Malphite CAN do the pushing job, just because he's so tanky that with a bit of tenacity and your Q you can get out of deep trouble pretty easy. However, he's so much better at team fights. The problem is, if you ulti in and disable their whole team and no one comes with you, it's not very useful. However, if you can explicitly tell your team who to focus, with your ulti and just spamming your abiltiies you can shut down their carry VERY fast. He's one of the classes capable of tanking, carrying and doing both well enough to make the game as simple as four buttons for even the worst players.

    Try it out. Teemo = most fun.
    Couscous; the food so nice they named it twice

  8. #8
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    Great post! I read all of it, and I am not into competitive gaming at all. Rep for you!
    Last edited by TBlaar; 24-09-2012 at 12:56 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamrock View Post
    Glad you guys liked it. Quick update:



    Try it out. Teemo = most fun.
    Teemo is my favorite and best char... easy kill steals tho

  10. #10
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    Good advice. Also stay away from Teemo. Unless you like being the centre of the enemies attention

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