View Poll Results: How do you feel about your job ?

Voters
60. You may not vote on this poll
  • Absolutely LOVE it! Hate Fridays, Love Mondays

    5 8.33%
  • The good times outweigh the bad times

    26 43.33%
  • Its a bit crap, but it pays the bills

    19 31.67%
  • Kill me now and get it over with

    10 16.67%
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Results 71 to 79 of 79

Thread: How do you feel about your job ?

  1. #71

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    I won't say I hate my job, but it is not something I see myself doing for an extended period of time. I have a understanding manager and some really amazing staff working with me so it has it's merits. How ever as with many companies people who belong to unions seem to be the most self entitled and come off as pushy or arrogant. I have made peace with the fact that they are stuck in their ways and do not like to partake in the change which some of the newer and younger staff have brought into the business.

    My job also has the potential to make me a tidy sum of money, if I part take in the many offerings the business has, but due to the above mentioned it does not make it that easy, which I am okay with. I earn enough to pay my bills and studies as well as, indulge in a few luxuries I would not otherwise have been able to do. Had I been working at another job, or never left my previous ones.

  2. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ichigo View Post
    I work for myself at home and enjoying it and making more money than I did when I worked for someone else.
    what kind of work do you do from home [MENTION=3223]Ichigo[/MENTION] ?

  3. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Weasley View Post
    what kind of work do you do from home [MENTION=3223]Ichigo[/MENTION] ?
    Helping people with computer problems. [MENTION=468]Weasley[/MENTION]
    Last edited by Ichigo; 12-10-2015 at 02:43 PM.

    Ichigo Ftw

  4. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by FarligOpptreden View Post
    Awesome! Please share your thoughts so long, publically if you don't mind. I'm sure most people would love to hear about your experiences so far. I've you have some Scandi blood in you I'm sure you settle in easier, especially if also you understand the language a bit.
    Well it's only been 2 weeks, but so far I am really enjoying it.

    As I understand it, the weather is milder than the other Scandinavian countries. I was in København yesterday and it was about 10 degrees or so with the sun shining.

    The people are very friendly in general and pretty much everyone speaks English. I've come across quite a few people working in hotels etc who do not speak Danish though. In general they are very open and positive towards the language, which makes settling in easier.

    The Danish language.. It's quite difficult to understand. I can read quite a lot of it but spoken Danish is another story. It just flows and it kinda sounds like they are mumbling. As a germanic language, supposedly it will be easier for me to learn. Starting Danish classes soon, so time will tell.

    Personally, it's not a culture shock at all. The main problem is the language barrier. Other than that I don't feel out of place at all.

    So far, everything just works. Public transport is amazing. Bus stops are everywhere and they run until late. I don't see myself getting a car anytime soon. Oh and of course they are on time. Not South Africa's version of on time.

    The population is about 5.4 mil, so there is more than enough space for everyone. Their houses, gardens etc are similar to what I'm used to in Cape Town. Really beautiful, lots of trees and forests etc. Really beautiful country!

    It's very, very safe here. Even in the bigger cities, for the most part you can walk just about anywhere, anytime. Of course there are a few exceptions.

    I take the bicycle to the shop, leave it outside without locking it, do my shopping and it's still there when I'm done. None of the houses that I've seen have burglar bars or any security fences. They sometimes have small fences for dogs and such. There isn't a big police presence in Århus, their second biggest city and where I live, but that might be different in København. From what I saw yesterday though, it's also not very big.

    It's one of the most important reasons for leaving SA. We've become conditioned to think that it's normal the way things are, but it most certainly is not. I can't begin to explain how awesome it is not to worry about your own or loved one's safety all the time. Things seriously need to change in SA.

    The internet. Oh my word, what a pleasure. The place I'm staying at has about 120/20 Mbps fibre connection with a ping of 7 to the local speed test server. 30gbs, 30mins more or less. Of course you can go a lot faster. A friend of mine has a 300/300 connection with a TV service included. Awesome playing Wildstar, ESO, heroes of the storm etc with a 20/30 ping.

    I am certain I will miss the SA weather though. But the little to no violent crime here more than makes up for it.

    Some negatives include the high taxes and high living costs. But then again salaries are higher and everything works. Health care is free and of a great standard. So your tax money is well spent. For a decent burger at a restaurant you can expect to pay about 130 Danish krone (R260). Alcohol and cigarettes are expensive.

    If you've got specific questions just ask and I'll answer as best I can.

    My gut tells me I'll enjoy living here and I'm really positive about the country. Will see how the next few months go.

  5. #75

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    [MENTION=1608]shibobo[/MENTION] What industry are you in career-wise? How did you manage to make the move to Denmark? What type of visa or you on there and how does permanent residency and citizenship work over there?

    The fact that the country borders Germany appeals to me - I love German efficiency and have already started learing some of the language (which isn't all the difficult for an Afrikaans boytjie, to be honest). I also know a biy of Swedish and can read it quite well for the most part. Speaking or understanding it is quite different, I agree. Have a couple of Swedish and Norwegian friends and one Danish contact.
    --~<0>~-- {type}DEV --~<0>~--

  6. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by FarligOpptreden View Post
    [MENTION=1608]shibobo[/MENTION] What industry are you in career-wise? How did you manage to make the move to Denmark? What type of visa or you on there and how does permanent residency and citizenship work over there?

    The fact that the country borders Germany appeals to me - I love German efficiency and have already started learing some of the language (which isn't all the difficult for an Afrikaans boytjie, to be honest). I also know a biy of Swedish and can read it quite well for the most part. Speaking or understanding it is quite different, I agree. Have a couple of Swedish and Norwegian friends and one Danish contact.
    I am an attorney working in the legal department of a Danish company with subsidiaries all over the world, including South Africa. However, if you want to practice in Denmark you would need authorisation and the requirements are quite high / difficult for anyone other than a local, i.e. Danish Bachelor's and Master's degree + Danish official recognition.

    There are quite a few professions on the skills shortage or Positive List and the requirements are stated. I was lucky because I know someone involved with the company, which made the process much easier. I don't think Denmark is that easy to get into to be honest, but it can be done. If you are on the shortage list your chances are pretty decent I think. Attorneys and legal professionals are listed by the way.

    I have a residence and work permit for a specific period, which can be extended. It is attached to the company I work for. If I change jobs I have to reapply, but that shouldn't be too much of a problem because having the job is key.

    To qualify for permanent residence you have to permanently reside here for 5 years plus a few other requirements such as passing a language test etc. For citizenship by way of naturalisation, 9 years plus a few other things.

    Going to Hamburg from Århus, where I live, is faster than going to København. It's a different world out here, really easy to travel around by bus, train or air. Looking forward to a few weeks off at the end of the year.

  7. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by shibobo View Post
    I am an attorney working in the legal department of a Danish company with subsidiaries all over the world, including South Africa. However, if you want to practice in Denmark you would need authorisation and the requirements are quite high / difficult for anyone other than a local, i.e. Danish Bachelor's and Master's degree + Danish official recognition.

    There are quite a few professions on the skills shortage or Positive List and the requirements are stated. I was lucky because I know someone involved with the company, which made the process much easier. I don't think Denmark is that easy to get into to be honest, but it can be done. If you are on the shortage list your chances are pretty decent I think. Attorneys and legal professionals are listed by the way.

    I have a residence and work permit for a specific period, which can be extended. It is attached to the company I work for. If I change jobs I have to reapply, but that shouldn't be too much of a problem because having the job is key.

    To qualify for permanent residence you have to permanently reside here for 5 years plus a few other requirements such as passing a language test etc. For citizenship by way of naturalisation, 9 years plus a few other things.

    Going to Hamburg from Århus, where I live, is faster than going to København. It's a different world out here, really easy to travel around by bus, train or air. Looking forward to a few weeks off at the end of the year.
    I'm really jealous right now. I'll have to see whether my profession is on the skills shortage list, but I'd rather expand my business' boundaries to Europe than giving up on it entirely. I'm sure the services, skills and quality of work we deliver in the Software Engineering industry will be appreciated there. I already have a contact in Estonia to get some work done there (holding thumbs).

    Besides, I have 9 other staff members to consider if I leave...
    --~<0>~-- {type}DEV --~<0>~--

  8. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by shibobo View Post
    I am an attorney working in the legal department of a Danish company with subsidiaries all over the world, including South Africa. However, if you want to practice in Denmark you would need authorisation and the requirements are quite high / difficult for anyone other than a local, i.e. Danish Bachelor's and Master's degree + Danish official recognition.

    There are quite a few professions on the skills shortage or Positive List and the requirements are stated. I was lucky because I know someone involved with the company, which made the process much easier. I don't think Denmark is that easy to get into to be honest, but it can be done. If you are on the shortage list your chances are pretty decent I think. Attorneys and legal professionals are listed by the way.

    I have a residence and work permit for a specific period, which can be extended. It is attached to the company I work for. If I change jobs I have to reapply, but that shouldn't be too much of a problem because having the job is key.

    To qualify for permanent residence you have to permanently reside here for 5 years plus a few other requirements such as passing a language test etc. For citizenship by way of naturalisation, 9 years plus a few other things.

    Going to Hamburg from Århus, where I live, is faster than going to København. It's a different world out here, really easy to travel around by bus, train or air. Looking forward to a few weeks off at the end of the year.
    I have to agree, traveling when you are not in SA is so much easier. It is really the one thing I miss the most about my time in the UK. It was really just a cheap train ride to go to a different country - except for the visas (The Netherlands was a nightmare of 3 interview, 7 letters and a doctors note just to get a Schengen Visa for the week I was there.) But seriously once you start earning their currency, you have to stop converting to Rand. Then you really realise how cheap it is. Yes it feels expensive at first, but I mean I paid 50 pounds for a travel pass that gave me access to the tubes, underground as well as overland trains in London. Plus if you keep an eye out you got amazing deals for flights between the EU countries - we paid about 80 Pounds for 2 return tickets to the netherlands over xmas . . .

    And yes - [MENTION=1608]shibobo[/MENTION] don't bother with a car - they are actually cheap to buy there but the licensing and insurance is bloody expensive normally. Besides you have busses and trains. :P

  9. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyvern View Post
    I have to agree, traveling when you are not in SA is so much easier. It is really the one thing I miss the most about my time in the UK. It was really just a cheap train ride to go to a different country - except for the visas (The Netherlands was a nightmare of 3 interview, 7 letters and a doctors note just to get a Schengen Visa for the week I was there.) But seriously once you start earning their currency, you have to stop converting to Rand. Then you really realise how cheap it is. Yes it feels expensive at first, but I mean I paid 50 pounds for a travel pass that gave me access to the tubes, underground as well as overland trains in London. Plus if you keep an eye out you got amazing deals for flights between the EU countries - we paid about 80 Pounds for 2 return tickets to the netherlands over xmas . . .

    And yes - [MENTION=1608]shibobo[/MENTION] don't bother with a car - they are actually cheap to buy there but the licensing and insurance is bloody expensive normally. Besides you have busses and trains. [emoji14]
    I know I shouldn't convert, but still awaiting my first paycheck. Burger at a place in Nyhavn, København = 140 krone = R280. I'm sure I'll figure things out once I start earning their currency.

    I have been really fortunate. The people have been so friendly and doing a lot to make me feel at home. I've been invited to go to Norway next month. Really looking forward to it. I think it's even more expensive over there though.

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