Five tips to be the best from South Africa’s top eSports team

esports-winner

Recently MyGaming interviewed Bravado’s Andreas Hadjipaschali about what it means to be a top eSports MGO in South Africa.

While discussing factors like latency, failing on the international stage and training, Hadjipaschali outlined five core points in order to be the very best.

This is what he had to say:


Dedication

Can you play for 6-8 hours a day to achieve the above?

‘Fail’ could be defined as anything, depending what the objective is to the team on hand that’s playing that specific event.

When it comes to our teams (just an example) we always set realistic objectives of what we want to achieve every time we play on the international stage and I think we achieved those objectives in some of our events.

This could include examples like the WESG in Dubai this year or the MSI Beat It in Taiwan a few years back.

Practice

Other than scrimming, are you practicing properly? Quality over quantity people.

It’s almost like going to gym on day 1 – lifting 10 kg, then going to gym on day 2 and deciding you only want to lift 5 kg’s because there’s no 10kg equipment.

Then when you come back on day 3 and not being able to lift 10 kg, just because the day before, you weren’t able to continue that consistency of lifting 10kg.

Roles

Are you playing with the right people in well defined roles, or is it just a circus?

Once we reach the level where we can execute synergy and good team gamestyle all the time without us even realizing that we’re doing it, I think that’s when we achieve the level of being able to play those 1 or 2 important international games the exact same way we’re playing those 3 ‘top-performing’ games we would have achieved in a different/separate environment.

Review

Are you working on turning your weak points into strong ones and how? Are you consistently reviewing your mistakes?

Many may say ‘So you’re saying we need to play better teams, to get better’ – I am saying: You need to play better teams/teams on your level (depending what you’re trying to achieve) who have a wide variety of dynamics so that you can sub-conciously prepare for any team/situation and not get used to one type of gameplay/style.

External Factors

Obviously to achieve the above objectives (given that we have the opportunity to do so) there’s a ton of other external factors that come into play.

It’s no secret that South Africa has its own issues with regards to latency and player counts compared to Europe, the USA and Asia.

To achieve the above objectives (given that we have the opportunity to do so) there’s a ton of other external factors that come into play, before you can even get to this step.

Unfortunately, the biggest problem to building this consistency (without us even knowing we’re doing it) is that we don’t have the opportunity to practice against a huge pool and therefore, we’re switching between ‘modes’ very often.

The above is mainly due to our distance from the rest of the world, because:

  1. We can’t often attend many offline international events, as it works out super expensive – which comes to another point I’ll discuss another time based on investment in South Africa from a corporate sponsorship perspective.
  2. Practicing online is almost impossible with massive pings.

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Five tips to be the best from South Africa’s top eSports team

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